Acta Nat. Sci.   |  e-ISSN: 2718-0638

Original article | Acta Natura et Scientia 2020, Vol. 1(1) 69-81

Determination of Artificial Incubation Time of Some Malawi Cichlid Species Incubating in the Mouth (Iodotropheus sprengerae, Cyrtocara moorii, Maylandia estherae, Labidochromis caeruleus) Eggs  

Pınar Çelik & Bahadır Rıfat Yalçın

pp. 69 - 81   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/actanatsci.2020.313.9   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2009-30-0004.R1

Published online: December 19, 2020  |   Number of Views: 18  |  Number of Download: 79


Abstract

Malawi cichlid species belonging to the Cichlidae family are among the most popular commercial species in the aquarium industry. Females of this species begin to incubate their eggs in the mouth after ovulation. Professional producers continue to induce vomiting of the eggs from the female's mouth at many different times and grow them with artificial incubation. The aim of this study is to determine the most appropriate time to induce vomiting and artificial incubation of eggs of these species. For this purpose, rusty cichlid (Iodotropheus sprengerae), blue dolphin cichlid (Cyrtocara moorii), red zebra cichlid (Maylandia estherae) and electric yellow cichlid (Labidochromis caeruleus) were produced in colonies. The development of eggs and larvae obtained from broodstocks were observed. Critical times for cichlid culture have been determined. While electric yellow cichlid (L. caeruleus) completed its embryonic development on the 3rd day after ovulation, blue dolphin cichlid (C. moorii) and red zebra cichlid (M. estherae) species completed on the 4th day, rusty cichlid (I. sprengerae) completed on the 5th day. Therefore, the results of the present study revealed that it is not appropriate to apply the same incubation technique to all these species.

 

 

 

Keywords: Ornamental fish, Cichlidae, Malawi cichlid species, Hatching


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Celik, P. & Yalcin, B.R. (2020). Determination of Artificial Incubation Time of Some Malawi Cichlid Species Incubating in the Mouth (Iodotropheus sprengerae, Cyrtocara moorii, Maylandia estherae, Labidochromis caeruleus) Eggs   . Acta Natura et Scientia, 1(1), 69-81. doi: 10.29329/actanatsci.2020.313.9

Harvard
Celik, P. and Yalcin, B. (2020). Determination of Artificial Incubation Time of Some Malawi Cichlid Species Incubating in the Mouth (Iodotropheus sprengerae, Cyrtocara moorii, Maylandia estherae, Labidochromis caeruleus) Eggs   . Acta Natura et Scientia, 1(1), pp. 69-81.

Chicago 16th edition
Celik, Pinar and Bahadir Rifat Yalcin (2020). "Determination of Artificial Incubation Time of Some Malawi Cichlid Species Incubating in the Mouth (Iodotropheus sprengerae, Cyrtocara moorii, Maylandia estherae, Labidochromis caeruleus) Eggs   ". Acta Natura et Scientia 1 (1):69-81. doi:10.29329/actanatsci.2020.313.9.

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